Medieval adventures

Sibylla’s Plaid Coat

Having a seventh century Anglo Saxon Woman’s persona of nobility means that I really should have a coat. To make a coat, I first consulted the pages of these two books, which was enough information to lead me down a reasonably good path. Cloth and Clothing in Early Anglo Saxon England, AD 450-700 and Dress in Anglo-Saxon England ISBN 978-1-902771-54-0. The idea of plaid was an inspiration found on Pinterest which lead me to the following link, http://users.stlcc.edu/mfuller/Canterbury/Buckland.html. Pinterest can be a bit of a rabbit hole so be careful and be warned that it could be several hours before emerging from the depths of information. Also, check your links as sometimes the information shared is not always historically correct. The first coat I made for myself was created using an old blanket I found at a yard sale for one dollar and was pale pink. To enhance the look of the coat I embroidered the sleeve cuffs and finished all of the edges with the blanket stitch. For fun, I have included a photo of it finished. It was a bit smaller than the scarlet red version you see in the photo below. The red version, which I am using as a pattern, is a little too big and has gores (triangle shapes sewn into the side seams) which I am not sure if my persona should have included this type of feature in a coat for my chosen time period. The red version has embroidery on the sleeves (not much) as well as a cord couched down that was made using a weaving fork. The herringbone stitch was embroidered and couched down around the neckline and front opening. The new plaid coat is a third attempt at creating a coat for me that fits and is fun to wear. It is my first time including lining which was a bit of a challenge to finish. In the following paragraphs, I will share the steps I used to create my new coat. I will also include troubleshooting techniques, point out what I have learned doing this project, and discuss reasons for my choices. I hope this helps you create a coat of your own. Cheers!